Sunday, March 15, 2009

Farm News

After a slow start things are really picking up quick regarding our membership. Kinda mirrors the weather, huh. I also noticed that someone has found a way to spam blogs via the comments. Oh well.

The onions are up, I'll get a picture on Tuesday.

I wanted to say a few words about Biodynamics w/r/t Open Heart Farm. It seems timely, because I am getting more involved in certain aspects of Steiner's philosophy (for more on Rudolph Steiner click now) I realize how un-deep I am in to some of it, at least as of yet. The farm does plant by the cycles of the moon and use two very simple versions of compost tea. I'm realizing as I describe this that you kind of have to know what's lacking to understand that Open Heart is a loose interpretation. Many biodynamic preps call for very specific measurements of like up to ten or more things, some of which could be powdered alminum, ground bone of importantly different animals, certain plants at special time of the year (that's the part we come closest to). Anyways, didn't want to give any false impressions that we did the steer horn. I have my own ill-informed beefs with Anthroposophy and Biodynamic which basically come down to not being local enough. I feel, nay, guess, that, for instance, Steiner didn't take into account the sheer amount of electro-magnetics we are dealing with, especially in urban ag.

I think the Flack Family may practice a few more of these things, but one thing I wanted to stress, is that I bet all farms use a combination of proactices that are all their own. Even alot of conventional farmers do one or two things that are technically organic, or are intentionally a hybrid.

Um, maybe more on t his topic later.

1 Comments:

Blogger mara said...

Hey Josh!

I appreciate your frankness in regards to the biodynamics gig. We just spoke at a conference in Saratoga Springs where another couple from Roxbury Farm spoke (Jody & Jean Paul Courtens) - they farm 1000 CSA shares biodynamically. Their story was fascinating and I learned a lot. Especially that there are many stages that one can understand and practice biodynamics. We got the feeling that Jody & Jean Paul are biodynamic farming 3.0. There's A LOT to learn, and it takes time as well as a cumulative awareness of the personality of your farm. Good work, and I look forward to more dialogue about this!!!
Mara

10:46 PM, March 15, 2009  

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