Sunday, July 01, 2012

Week 5

I call this share summer without tomatoes cause we've got all the classics, except those, which I anticipate starting slowly next week.  The plants (tomato plants), by the way, look really good.  Absolutely no disease, knock on wood, so hopefully A nice long tomato season.

Before I get to the share a few other bits of business:

1. Flowers are plentiful.  There must be fifty snapdragons waiting to be cut.  Even the sun Flowers are starting so I encourage all members to take a bouquet or two a week, stop by the herb circle for mint, sage, oregano, and thyme.

2.  Green Mountain compost: We did not use any compost from GMC from the time period they say may be effected.  This is just a case of good fortune for us, one that is reminiscent of zen parable: a farmers son finds a beautiful horse and brings it home, the neighbors say, oh how lucky you are, the dad says, we'll see.  Then the son tries to ride the horse and breaks his leg.  The neighbors say, oh how unlucky, dad says, we'll see.  Then some people from the army come around looking to conscript troops but see the son is injured and pass him by . . . you get the idea.  Well in this case: Yeah flood.  Had Last year been a normal year I probably would have used the effected compost this spring, but as it stands, I only used it last fall for the garlic, because we had not really enough farming the previous year to merit more compost (beside the fact that we are trying to move to green manure more instead of compost).  In any case, we will not be using their compost again.  It is just not worth the risk.  I am sure lots of farmers will have the same position.  It is a little sad to see a business like this flounder, one that could be so generally helpful, and in the larger analysis the herbicides used are obviously ones that they didn't create and that we should be questioning the use of.  Larger conversations.

3.  Tips for Lettuce Maintenance.  A member told me last we that she cleans and cuts all the head lettuce right when they get home from pick-up.  Then they know what they have and it is easier to eat.  I admit I'm not always on the ball enough to do something like this but a great idea.  This week we are moving to lettuce mix which will come to you cut washed and bagged.  The trick for keeping it freshest longest is to not squish it, even keep the bag a bit puffy, and tied.

this week:

lettuce
parsley, dill, or cilantro
squash/zukes
peas
cuke(s)
kale or cabbage
new potatoes.
 

2 Comments:

Blogger Melody Lowes said...

I'm waiting anxiously for my tomatoes, too - there is nothing like a home-grown tomato to wash the taste of the 'fakers' from the store out of your mouth - a cardboard copy, I call them. Wishful thinking tomatoes... I love to garden, and love to wash up my organic goods and dig in to a leafy supper, all summer. Nice blog.

2:33 PM, July 09, 2012  
Blogger Melody Lowes said...

I'm waiting anxiously for my tomatoes, too - there is nothing like a home-grown tomato to wash the taste of the 'fakers' from the store out of your mouth - a cardboard copy, I call them. Wishful thinking tomatoes... I love to garden, and love to wash up my organic goods and dig in to a leafy supper, all summer. Nice blog.

2:33 PM, July 09, 2012  

Post a Comment

Links to this post:

Create a Link

<< Home